Film Screening: 'More Than Honey'

The Office of Sustainability/UCGreen and the Center for Science and the Common Good present a screening of More Than Honey, a 2012 documentary directed by Markus Imhoof about colony collapse disorder, the unexplained disappearance of honeybees across the globe.

Followed by a beehive tour at the Organic Farm on Saturday.

From the film's web site:

Over the past 15 years, numerous colonies of bees have been decimated throughout the world, but the causes of this disaster remain unknown. Depending on the world region, 50% to 90% of all local bees have disappeared, and this epidemic is still spreading from beehive to beehive all over the planet. Everywhere, the same scenario is repeated: billions of bees leave their hives, never to return. No bodies are found in the immediate surroundings, and no visible predators can be located.

In the US, the latest estimates suggest that a total of 1.5 million (out of 2.4 million total beehives) have disappeared across 27 states. In Germany, according to the national beekeepers association, one fourth of all colonies have been destroyed, with losses reaching up to 80% on some farms. The same phenomenon has been observed in Switzerland, France, Italy, Portugal, Greece, Austria, Poland and England, where this syndrome has been nicknamed "the Mary Celeste Phenomenon", after a ship whose crew vanished in 1872.

There is good reason to be worried: 80% of plant species require bees to be pollinated. Without bees, there is no pollinization, and fruits and vegetables could disappear from the face of the Earth. Apis mellifera (the honey bee), which appeared on Earth 60 million years before man and is as indispensable to the economy as it is to man's survival.

Should we blame pesticides or even medication used to combat them? Maybe look at parasites such as varroa mites? New viruses? Travelling stress? The multiplication of electromagnetic waves disturbing the magnetite nanoparticles found in the bees' abdomen? So far, it looks like a combination of all these agents has been responsible for the weakening of the bees' immune defenses.

Musser Auditorium

Pfahler Hall
Ursinus College
Collegeville, PA 19426

Monday, Sep 30, 2013

Contact:

Travis Maider

Phone: 978-987-8447

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